How to stop worrying and you sleep better

How to stop worrying and you sleep better

Accept that you tend to worry easily about different things. Stop fighting your worries. The moment of worry method is especially useful when you have a habit of dealing with the things in bed that you have been thinking about during the day, recently, in the present. The goal is to put an end to the day’s things and plans for the future in the evening so you can sleep in peace. If you manage to break the distracting thinking in bed, falling asleep is easier.

With these instructions, you can leave your worries for the night.

Reserve 15-30 minutes a couple of hours before going to bed. Take out a sheet of paper and a pen. You can write down your worries, feelings, ideas and solutions on paper. Make a note of any thoughts you have, even if you have not come up with any solution to this issue. If you have a solution or suggestion to something, take it as far as you can. If you can’t influence something, leave it to other people, time, or higher forces. The purpose of the method is to make you feel that all things are under control. You can decide for yourself what to do with your worry notes. You can discard your notes if you are afraid someone will see them or burn the paper as a sign that you will no longer let things on the paper bother or harass you. You can also read your notes aloud to get your worries away or you can introduce them to someone close to you to learn to treat them differently, for example with humor. However, if new plans, thoughts, or ideas come up at bedtime, a sheet of paper can be reserved next to the bed where they can be recorded and processed the next day. Keep in mind that thoughts that mix with bedtime are easier to put aside if they have already been addressed while awake.

If something starts to bother your mind again, say:

  “Stop. Now is not the time to address this issue. I can return to it again tomorrow. Now let’s sleep. ”

How to stop worrying and you sleep better

What could I do for sleep today?

If you do not fall asleep in 15-30 minutes, it would be good to get up from the bed, go to another room or sit in a chair. You should stay away from bed until you are sleepy, then you can go to bed again to sleep.

The rule is intended to strengthen the connection between bed and sleep. Many insomniac begins to associate suffering and anxiety with bed. The more you stay awake in the bed, the stronger the habit develops, which is the so-called wrong kind of conditioning. However, getting up can be difficult to accomplish because the bed feels cozy, intense fatigue and exhaustion weigh, and you just don’t want to get up from the comfortable bed. To make getting up from the bed easier, you can try to make it as pleasant as possible.

  • Put the dim lamp on and reserve a blanket for the sofa or armchair. You can also bring your own pillow and blanket.
  • You can reserve a hot drink (milk, juice, decaffeinated herbal tea, etc.)
  • You can read, listen to music, or do something calming that doesn’t refresh your mind.
  • When you feel sleepy, go back to bed. If you are still not sleeping, get up from the bed to sit on the couch or chair again.
  • Follow the get up from the bed rule until you fall asleep.
  • This rule should also be followed if you wake up at night and have trouble falling asleep.
  • Avoid napping in the evening on the couch or armchair. Snoozing weakens the important connection between the bed and you.
How to stop worrying and you sleep better

What is worry moment? An easy way to help you to fall asleep

Insomnia is excruciating. As you spin around the bed from night to night and stare at the alarm clock, you start to be afraid of future nights already during the day. One in five adults suffers from insomnia three nights a week. While insomnia is common, many are ashamed of their insomnia. – The old generalization of insomnia as a mental problem is persistent, and mental health problems are associated with shame, one sleep therapist says.

There is a lot of talk about sleeping and guidelines for good sleep are shared everywhere. When sleep does not come in spite of them, a person might feel unsuccessful. Many times a conscientious and self-demanding, sleepless person begins to believe that he is bad in every way. – If you want to sleep, you have to lower the level of requirements. One has to accept that sometimes he sleeps poorly. The sleepless person sleeps even on bad nights, but sleep is light and does not refresh enough. Rushing to sleep can become a bigger problem than a poorly slept night. Insomnia and its fear quickly forms a self-feeding spiral. – If your own means do not help in three weeks, you should seek help for insomnia, the sleep therapist says.

Worry moment calms the mind

Laura, 46

I don’t always know how to sleep properly, especially in new places. I still don’t let it limit my life and I really like to travel. I often go on a trip tired, because I worry and I can’t sleep for weeks before I leave on a trip.

My sleep problems started about 30 years ago. I worked abroad for many years and suffered from a burnout. Insomnia was a symptom of exhaustion. I slept in a new place really badly and didn’t understand how to seek help. The hard experience caused me fear that perpetuates insomnia. When I worry about the future in advance, I increase fear. I am sleepless panic.

There is a center of fear in the human brain, in the amygdala. When it tunes in, the involuntary nervous system accelerates vital functions and makes a person alert. It can be soothed with, for example, accepting, compassionate speech or imagination. These skills should be practiced during the day before fear is at its worst.

I have learned that I am not alone with my problems. Insomnia should not be underestimated, but sleep should not be given too much power in thought. That’s why I’m not talking about my insomnia with anyone. I’m afraid acquaintances would start asking about my sleep. It would make me to focus on sleep too much. The harder I try to sleep, the more alert I feel.

I have learned to accept poor sleep. Even though I sleep poorly, I will survive. There is nothing wrong with me. I can sleep well for months, and then the sleep starts to disappear. When I start to sleep poorly, I tell myself this is going to pass. I survived in the past. Why not survive now?

Mary, 51

As a child, I experienced a lot of sadness. Caring for my multi-disabled brother burdened the whole family. My mother became seriously ill. My parents divorced. I lost people close to me. Even if there are years of events and the mind would reject memories, the body remembers. It reacts when an event or thing reminds it of the past. My body reacts with insomnia, difficulty falling asleep.

I sought and received help from psychophysical physiotherapy. It is a specialty of physiotherapy that takes into account the connection between body and mind. Psychophysical physiotherapy takes advantage of a person’s own experience and increases body awareness. It has given me the ability to listen to my own body. I have got the tools to meet and interpret the messages in my body.

The gentle movement became my sleeping pill. Movement opens tensions in the mind. By experimenting, I learned what kind of movement I need at any given time. During the day, dancing may help with a lower back jam, and in the evening, stretching may feel good. I try to move every day.

Today, I can calm my body and mind with breathing exercises. I focus on breathing deeply as I go through my body parts through from head to toe.

I never look at the clock at night. If you don’t fall asleep right away, time information becomes stressful, and falling asleep becomes very difficult. Sleep can be lost sometimes for long periods of time and then surviving the next day feels scary. However, my thoughts of disaster have diminished. I control my body and thus my mind even better.

Psychophysical physiotherapy made me bolder. I study classical singing. I dare to sing songs whose words evoke strong emotions in me. My ability to tolerate and interpret emotions has been strengthened.

How to stop worrying and you sleep better

What is worry moment? An easy way to help you to fall asleep

Insomnia is excruciating. As you spin around the bed from night to night and stare at the alarm clock, you start to be afraid of future nights already during the day. One in five adults suffers from insomnia three nights a week. While insomnia is common, many are ashamed of their insomnia. – The old generalization of insomnia as a mental problem is persistent, and mental health problems are associated with shame, one sleep therapist says.

There is a lot of talk about sleeping and guidelines for good sleep are shared everywhere. When sleep does not come in spite of them, a person might feel unsuccessful. Many times a conscientious and self-demanding, sleepless person begins to believe that he is bad in every way. – If you want to sleep, you have to lower the level of requirements. One has to accept that sometimes he sleeps poorly. The sleepless person sleeps even on bad nights, but sleep is light and does not refresh enough. Rushing to sleep can become a bigger problem than a poorly slept night. Insomnia and its fear quickly forms a self-feeding spiral. – If your own means do not help in three weeks, you should seek help for insomnia, the sleep therapist says.

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